The Freedom From Religion Billboard Campaign

It’s quite difficult to drive a mile in most major American cities without seeing at least a few churches, bumper stickers, or billboards that advertise how much Jesus loves us.  Christian-related messages (no matter how poorly stated or taken out of context) seem to be all around us.  It hints that it’s somehow good to believe in something without evidence, reason, or logic.  Clearly, American policy under the Bush Administration has been shaped by this level of ignorance.

That’s why it’s good to see an organization actually fighting back.  BBSNews reports on the effort in Free Thought Takes on Organized Religion in National Billboard Campaign.  Below is an image of the sign along with a quote from the article:

imaginenoreligionbillboard

The national campaign is an effort to let Americans know that there is room for reason and clarity of thought, free from the dogma that organized religion uses to keep its flock in line; as well as donating.

Dan Barker, Foundation co-president and author of ‘Losing Faith in Faith: From Preacher to Atheist’ said “Many of our members, including generous sponsors in Ohio, want to balance all that religion on the roadside with some reason on the roadside.”

According to the FFRF, one of the local Ohio donors to the new nationwide sign campaign said, “Gov. Ted Strickland apparently needs to be reminded that many wonderful, patriotic, hard-working Ohioans do not ‘support churches.’ In fact, they believe that too much religious influence over state government is harming the state. In recent years, state officials have caved to the religious right on issues such as gay rights, the right of other consenting adults to live as they wish, and the display of Christian symbols on state property. These divisive actions have driven people from Ohio and distracted the state from the serious economic problems it faces.”

Obviously, we can expect a backlash against this type of “advertisement”.  It seems that many people who are reluctant to think for themselves have a problem with advertising the importance of free thought.  For some typical reactions, read some of the comments.  It’s always strange to me how threatened people feel by the mere suggestion that they question their “faith”.  If faith is the belief in something without evidence or reason, then shouldn’t we question (and, hopefully, reject) it?  For more information, see the Freedom From Religion Foundation‘s web site.

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3 Comments

  1. tshirtninja said,

    February 14, 2008 at 11:15 am

    >If faith is the belief in something without evidence or reason, then shouldn’t we question (and, hopefully, reject) it?

    Smart Christians have long rejected this definition of “faith.” The biblical definition of faith is trust based on evidence.

  2. AtypicalGuy said,

    February 14, 2008 at 12:20 pm

    I’m not sure I agree with this idea of “Smart Christians”, and am interested in the Biblical source of this definition of faith. For the vast majority of Christians, religion is something to be accepted without question. While some churches and leaders might say that they welcome doubters, the general belief is that one would face an eternity of torture for choosing otherwise. Rarely have I heard theologians provide any serious evidence for the existence of a God (this blog contains numerous posts with links to modern debates on religion). And beliefs are certainly beyond reproach for most of the “faithful”. If there’s truly evidence to support religion, let’s subject it to the rigors of scientific study. If Christian ideology can’t withstand that level of scrutiny, it should be rejected.

  3. tshirtninja said,

    February 15, 2008 at 10:24 am

    >I’m not sure I agree with this idea of “Smart Christians”,

    You should come to Theology Web (www.theologyweb.com). We’d be more than glad to have you there.

    >and am interested in the Biblical source of this definition of faith.

    No problem. The Greek word for faith is “pistis.” It’s a rhetorical term for forensic proof.

    >If there’s truly evidence to support religion, let’s subject it to the rigors of scientific study. If Christian ideology can’t withstand that level of scrutiny, it should be rejected.

    Actually it’s subjected to historical study, not scientific. But your point is well taken.


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